New PDF release: African American Folktales: Stories from Black Traditions in

By Roger Abrahams

ISBN-10: 030780318X

ISBN-13: 9780307803184

From the canefileds of the ante-bellum South, the villages of the Caribbean islands, and the streets of latest internal towns, listed here are multiple hundred stories from an "incredibly wealthy and affirmative storytelling tradition" (Choice).

Full of existence, knowledge, and humor, those stories variety from the earthy comedy of tricksters to tales explaining how the realm was once created and bought to be how it is, to ethical fables that inform of encounters among masters and slaves. They comprises tales set down in travelers' studies and plantation journals from the early 19th century, stories collected by means of creditors reminiscent of Joel Chandler Harris and Zora Neale Hurston, and narratives tape-recorded through Roger Abrahams himself in the course of wide expeditions through the American South and the Caribbean.

Part of the Pantheon Fairy story and Folkore Library

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Extra resources for African American Folktales: Stories from Black Traditions in the New World

Sample text

So Tane climbed the mountain and married his ancestress Hine-tu-a-maunga, and she became pregnant in her turn, but she too produced no man-child only rusty water and Man 31 a mountain for you Tane went back lizard. my son,' she said. to his mother, Papa. ' But Rangahore's child was a round stone. 'Then try your ancestress Ngaore. ' But Ngaore gave birth to tender and gentle rushes. So it was with all Tane's wives, not one of them gave him a man-child. ' 'You give 'I up too will easily. ' 'I can't marry my ancestor, Ocean,' said Tane.

The crow went. At who knows where flew and flew and flew and flew, last the breath left its body and back of Kekramal Chhatri the great fell tortoise, it with a thud on the who was sitting in the water with one arm on the bottom of the ocean and one arm reaching the sky. Kekramal Chhatri said, 'What you panting is the matter ? ' Earth 15 am 'I Where can searching for earth. ' find worm at the bottom of the ocean; the earth. I will take you to Logundi Logundi Raja and the Raja called the twelve brothers Loharsur, the thirteen brothers Tamersur and the fourteen brothers Agyasur, and they made a great iron cage with windows.

But Rangahore's child was a round stone. 'Then try your ancestress Ngaore. ' But Ngaore gave birth to tender and gentle rushes. So it was with all Tane's wives, not one of them gave him a man-child. ' 'You give 'I up too will easily. ' 'I can't marry my ancestor, Ocean,' said Tane. 'No indeed you can't. But you can marry the woman you make what you yourself beside him. ' So Tane followed the muttering of the ocean and soon he came down to the beach at Hawaiki, and squatted there right at the edge of the He sea.

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African American Folktales: Stories from Black Traditions in the New World by Roger Abrahams


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